Monday, 9 December 2013

Gerund - Grammar Exercises




Grammar exercises and activities for teaching the Gerund to English language learners. Some exercises include answer keys.

I. Define the forms of the gerund .
  1. Skiing is my favourite sport. 
  2. I remember his telling me about his coat. 
  3. I remember having seen this match. 
  4. Before taking up swimming she had been very fond of playing basketball. 
  5. The football player was punished for having pushed the centre forward. 
  6. The young high jumper was very proud of being praised. 
  7. I did not know you had stopped rooting for our team. 
  8. I remember having been told about this match.

Saturday, 23 November 2013

Participle Examples in Proverbs and Quotations

1. Point out participle I and participle II in the following proverbs.
  1. United we stand, divided we fall.
  2. Better untaught than ill taught.
  3. One volunteer is worth two pressed men.
  4. Fear the Greeks bearing gifts.
  5. Stolen sweets are sweetest.
  6. Forbidden fruit is sweetest.
  7. A forced kindness deserves no thanks.
  8. The rotten apple injures its neighbours.
  9. The beaten road is the safest.
  10. A watched pot never boils.

Wednesday, 16 October 2013

Nominative Absolute Participle Construction



The Nominative Absolute Construction is a construction in which the participle  stands in predicative relation to a noun in the Common Case or a pronoun in the Nominative Case; the noun or pronoun is not the subject of the sentence.

Key example: 
  • The wind blowing hard, the man turned up his collar. 

Tuesday, 24 September 2013

The Participle as the Part of a Complex Object or a Complex Subject



Similar to the Infinitive Participle I may form part of a Complex Object or Subject when combined with a noun (pronoun) to which it stands in predicate relation.

Compare:
  • I saw him run along the street. (Infinitive Complex Object)He was seen run along the street. (Infinitive Complex Subject)
  • I saw him running along the street. (Participle Complex Object)He was seen running along the street. (Participle Complex Subject)

Such complexes occur after verbs denoting physical perceptions – 'to see', 'to hear', 'to feel', 'to watch', 'to find', 'to catch'.

Monday, 26 August 2013

The Participle



The Forms of the Participle

  Active Passive
Indefinite writing being written
Perfect having written having been written

Note : - Those are the forms of Participle I which is formed by adding the suffix -ing to the stem of the verb (to go - going, to read - reading, etc.). Participle II has only one form (asked, came. spoken, cut, etc.).

Indefinite Participle denotes an action simultaneous with what expressed by the finite verb.
Perfect Participle denotes an action prior to that expressed by the finite verb.

Tuesday, 11 June 2013

Gerund examples in literature, proverbs and quotations


Proverbs and Sayings 

1. Comment on the use of the gerund in the following proverbs and sayings. Memorize them.
  1. Be slow in choosing a friend, slower in changing him. 
  2. He who likes borrowing dislikes paying
  3. By doing nothing we learn to do ill. 
  4. In doing we learn. 
  5. Learn to swim by swimming
  6. Think twice before speaking
  7. Saying and doing are two things (Saying is one thing and doing another.) 
  8. Doing is better than saying
  9. The word spoken is past recalling
  10. Seeing is believing

Thursday, 18 April 2013

The Gerund



The gerund is a non-finite form of the verb with some noun features. It is formed by adding the suffix -ing to the stem of the verb.

Example:  
Seeing is believing.

The gerund acts like a verb and a noun at the same time.

Like a verb:
     - It expresses action or a state of being.
     - The gerund has grammatical categories of voice and tense.
     - It may be modified by an adverb or have an object.  (E.g.: Reading (gerund) quickly (adverb) tires me.  I like reading (gerund) such books (direct object).)

Monday, 18 March 2013

Complex Object Exercises


English grammar exercises and activities for teaching Complex object to English language learners. Some exercises include answer keys.

Exercise 1 
Make up as many sentences as you can using the words and word-groups from each column of the substitution table. Pay attention that after verbs 'to see, to hear, to feel, to let, to make, etc...' the infinitive has no particle 'to' .

1) with the verb 'to see'
We
He
Everybody
see(s)
saw
them
a bricklayer
my friend
a boy
the landlady
move to a summer cottage.
lay a brick house.
enter a two-storey house.
draw a skyscraper.
speak to her lodger.
pull down a house.

Thursday, 28 February 2013

Infinitive Worksheet


The forms and functions of the Infinitive: free exercises and answers to check your result.

Exercise  1
Define the forms of the Infinitive (Passive or Active; Indefinite, Continuous, Perfect or Perfect Continuous) in the following sentences.
  1. I want to see your design.
  2. It can be done.
  3. The mistake must be found.
  4. We knew him to be working in the room.
  5. They are likely to be being served now.
  6. I remember to have seen her somewhere.
  7. We thought the mistake to have been found.
  8. He must have been working all night.
  9. She appeared to have been leading a very busy life before.
  10. It’s nice to be sitting here with you.
  11. It’s good to have finished work for the day.
  12. I’m sorry not to have come on Friday.
  13. I appear to have made a small mistake.
  14. I didn’t expect to be invited.
  15. There is a lot of work to do.
  16. There is a lot of work to be done.

Friday, 8 February 2013

Modal Verb May Examples


There are examples of the use of modal verb MAY in proverbs, sayings and quotations.

Proverbs

I
Note the use of the verb 'may / might' in the following proverbs and sayings. Memorize them.
  1. A cat may look at a king.
  2. Cowards may die many times before their death.
  3. A fair face may hide a foul heart.
  4. Bitter pills may have blessed effects.
  5. Be careful what you wish for, you just might get it.
  6. Hares may pull dead lions by the beard.
  7. The remedy may be worse than the disease.
  8. Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.
  9. When the oak is before the ash, then you will only get a splash; when the ash is before the oak, then you may expect a soak.
  10. If you don’t like it you may lump it.
  11. Between the cup and the lip a morsel may slip.

Thursday, 24 January 2013

Infinitive Complex Subject


Complex Subject

Noun/Pronoun + Predicate + Infinitive
The combination of a noun in the common case (or a pronoun in the nominative case) and an infinitive forms a complex subject (1).
The predicate which is usually expressed by a verb in the passive voice  is placed between the noun and the infinitive. The relation between the noun and the infinitive is that of subject and predicate.

Note 1: - According to another interpretation the subject is expressed by a noun or pronoun and the infinitive is regarded as a part of the predicate.

Key examples:
  • He is said to be a good teacher. 
  • The boy is known to have passed his exams well. 

The predicate in sentences with a complex subject can be expressed by:

Sunday, 6 January 2013

Infinitive Complex Object


Complex Object 

Subject + Predicate + Complex Object (Noun/Pronoun + Infinitive)

The combination of a noun in the common case or a pronoun in the objective case and an infinitive used after the predicate forms a complex object. The relation between the noun (pronoun) and the infinitive is that of subject and predicate.

Key examples:
  • I saw the boy raise his hand. 
  • I heard him call my name. 
  • I want you to know that it doesn't matter.